The following resources were compiled by Sarah Osborne Bender to support the Digital Humanities for Art Historians Mini-Workshop held at the ARLIS/NA Mid-Atlantic Summer Meeting, July 24, 2015, in Norfolk, Virginia.

How to keep up with developments in DH:

How to engage with DH initiatives local to our chapter:

Tools for teaching:

Tools for research:

Examples:

Two accessible data tools:

A few words about cleaning or “tidying” your data:
When working with structured data, having clean or “tidy” data can make a big difference. Hadley Wickham’s article Tidy Data is an excellent introduction if you’re working with data in spreadsheets, especially surveys or values. You can also drop your spreadsheet into Open Refine. This extremely powerful tool is good for resolving erroneous variations in data, and many other things. Thomas Padilla, Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State created an excellent guide to getting started in Open Refine.

Where can you get data to experiment with?
You can get unstructured data, full text of articles or correspondence for example, from sites like Project Guttenberg, Hathi Trust, even JSTOR, or places like the Archives of American Art that have full texts of things like oral histories.

More institutions are opening up their collection data all the time. Just last week, MOMA released its collection data on Github, joining the Tate and the Cooper Hewitt.